The Road to Ruin: Making Sense of the Anthropocene (editorial)

Ours is the age of global environmental collapse. Resources are being consumed at around 1.5 times the Earth’s ability to regenerate them. We are living through the sixth mass extinction and nearly two-thirds of all vertebral life has died since 1970. The stubborn entrenchment of carbon into our economies means that we are highly unlikelyContinue reading “The Road to Ruin: Making Sense of the Anthropocene (editorial)”

British leadership in the Anthropocene: an interview with Margaret Beckett

Britain has often led the world in understanding and responding to global environmental change. IPPR Progressive Review’s Laurie Laybourn-Langton talks to former Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett about what made Britain a leader and if it remains one today.  Laurie Laybourn-Langton:   Margaret Beckett, you are a former Foreign Secretary and Secretary of State for the DepartmentContinue reading “British leadership in the Anthropocene: an interview with Margaret Beckett”

Net-Zero North: Delivering the decarbonisation mission in the north of England (IPPR)

7th December 2017 The North’s economy is more carbon intensive than the English average, and its many carbon-intensive industries face a challenging transition. However, the North has a large economic potential, more of which could be unlocked from directed investment. This IPPR report sets out a regional green industrial strategy for delivering a decarbonised northContinue reading “Net-Zero North: Delivering the decarbonisation mission in the north of England (IPPR)”

A gloomy economic outlook reflects the failures of the last two chancellors

The most important story in this year’s Budget is the downward revision of both productivity and GDP growth. In March, the Office of Budget Responsibility expected growth in productivity per hour to come in at 1.6% in 2017 and by at least 1.5% in the years thereafter. Now, they do not expect productivity to have increasedContinue reading “A gloomy economic outlook reflects the failures of the last two chancellors”

The movement to replace neoliberalism is on the ascendency – where should it go next?

Ten years after the crash, the movement to replace neoliberalism is in the ascendency. Well organised campaigns cover everything from the promotion of pluralism in economic curricula to the application of new economic principles in local communities. Academics and campaigners, who prior to the crash were lone voices in the wind, have been joined by a growing chorusContinue reading “The movement to replace neoliberalism is on the ascendency – where should it go next?”