Event: Beyond ‘Hopeium’ and ‘Doomism’, Chatham House

As part of London Climate Action Week (LCAW), I chaired a fantastic panel that explored how to maintain focus and attention on reducing emissions even as horrifying climate impacts grow, featuring: Nina Jess, Schwarzman Academy Fellow, Environment and Society Programme, Chatham House Dr Jesse Reynolds, Executive Secretary, Global Commission on Governing Risks from Climate OvershootContinue reading “Event: Beyond ‘Hopeium’ and ‘Doomism’, Chatham House”

Event: Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford

Part of an event on “Governing in the climate crisis: how should future leaders prepare?”, I explored how the environmental crisis is creating a more chaotic – or ‘turbulent’ – world, what challenge that poses for the sustainability transition, and how emerging leaders need to be supported in their journey to senior leadership under theseContinue reading “Event: Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford”

Incredibly, current climate pledges could keep heating below 2C – but our work isn’t over

The battle to get countries and companies to sign up to net zero is being won. Now let’s keep pushing for more ambitious targets The climate crisis is often seen in binary terms. Precise temperature targets – limiting global heating to 1.5C or 2C – imply decisive moments of victory or loss. Headlines warn thatContinue reading “Incredibly, current climate pledges could keep heating below 2C – but our work isn’t over”

Heat pumps and tipping points: Weaning the world off Russian energy

For years, climate activists have called for a war-like mobilization to drive a rapid transition to clean energy. Today, these demands have taken on a new urgency: Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has been a relentless demonstration of just how much fossil fuels threaten the world’s shared security.  The brutality of Russia’s military, the Kremlin’s leverage over NATO,Continue reading “Heat pumps and tipping points: Weaning the world off Russian energy”

Will millennials be ready to lead the world in 2040?

Xi Jinping started 2019 with a series of major speeches on risk. Hundreds of senior officials from across China were summoned to Beijing to hear his message: destabilisation and turbulence are on the horizon. Officials were warned to watch out for “black swans”—events that are unforeseen and take us by surprise—and “grey rhinos”—events that are highly likelyContinue reading “Will millennials be ready to lead the world in 2040?”

Covid has shown us the consequences of not taking systemic risk seriously

A central lesson of the Covid-19 pandemic for environmentalism is that it needs get more serious about risk. The pandemic has proven a classic example of a systemic shock: a health crisis graduated into a financial crisis, an economic crisis, a social crisis, a political crisis and so on. Last year, worsening environmental shocks metContinue reading “Covid has shown us the consequences of not taking systemic risk seriously”

COP26 and Health: Some Progress, But Too Slow and Not Enough

The editorial on climate change and biodiversity published in over 220 health journals in September had two main demands: keep global temperature increases below 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels to avoid catastrophic damage to health; and accept that this can be achieved only by rich countries making bigger cuts in greenhouse gas emissions and transferring substantialContinue reading “COP26 and Health: Some Progress, But Too Slow and Not Enough”

How can future leaders prepare for an environmentally-destabilized world?

World leaders will be glad to see the back of another year of complex problems. The pandemic and its impact on health, the knock-on effects on labour markets and the recent surges in demand for goods as restrictions have eased are huge problems that together have disrupted the delicate choreography of global trade. Meanwhile, a summer ofContinue reading “How can future leaders prepare for an environmentally-destabilized world?”